ABC

The Public Blackout

Quality journalism is expensive for media companies. But the cost to society of the absence of quality journalism is infinitely greater. No more is this loss more evident than in the slow eradication from the Read more…

By Mr Denmore, ago
Advertising

Last Ones Standing

[caption width="500" id="attachment_1183" align="alignnone"]7257348-3x2-700x467 Photo by Nick Ryan, Fairfax[/caption]

The slow-motion death of newspapers as a vehicle for quality journalism rolls on, with periodic announcements of new waves of redundancies prompting anger, soul-searching and recrimination.

For those of us who escaped the industry years ago, there are feelings of both relief that we got out when we did and sympathy for journalists laid off by companies who still appear clueless about how to make the business work in a digital age.

But while the journalists' mass walkouts and calls for public solidarity are completely understandable, the market realities facing the industry that has sheltered them for long can't be ignored.

(more…)

By Mr Denmore, ago
Advertising

Stuck Inside of Mobile

[caption id="attachment_525" align="alignleft" width="300"]crowd-of-mobile-users-res Photo Courtesy The Guardian[/caption]

The digital revolution will not be televised. And it’s not in the newspapers either. In fact, media companies don’t seem to get the revolution at all.

A decade and half since newspapers started distractedly plastering their content all over the internet (mistaking the web as just another publishing platform), the media owners are getting whacked anew. (more…)

By Mr Denmore, ago
Craft Standards

Noise Vs Signal

One of the curses of being a news journalist is that the 'news' (a hazy concept at the best of times)  must always fit the available space. The space for news has been expanding exponentially in recent years as new digital, real-time platforms emerge. At the same time, the resource to fill that space has been dwindling. What do you think happens? (more…)

By Mr Denmore, ago
Blogging

Reinventing Journalism

It is a painful time for many journalists. Cast aside from the failing industry that used to provide them with a secure living, they are confused, frustrated and in some cases downright angry that society no longer seems to put a dollar value on the skills they worked so hard to perfect. That the wounds of mass redundancies are still raw was rammed home to me last week when I took part in a panel at an inner Sydney hotel organised by the Public Interest Journalism Foundation (PJIF) to "share ideas and experiences around innovation in journalism". (more…)

By Mr Denmore, ago
Craft Standards

Media Stockholm Syndrome

'Twenty Ways to Bulk Up Your Cash'. That was the breathless headline in The Australian Financial Review on September, 27, 2005 "It's shop till you drop for ordinary people with money to park," the article gushed. "And the range of investment options is so vast, it's very nearly an embarrassment of riches." (more…)

By Mr Denmore, ago
Business Models

Dawn of the Dead

Breaking news: The news business isn't dead. But that's not because the news business was ever alive on its own terms. It's because news was never a business. In fact, the idea that you can make a living out of news is a dream that many people have yet to wake up from. Journalists leaving the industry - and there are hordes right now walking the streets like extras in a George Romero movie - talk up the prospect of setting up collectives that "sell" breaking news directly. The truth is, however, the audience isn't buying. People won't pay for general news. They never have....directly anyway. (more…)

By Mr Denmore, ago