Craft Standards

Damned Lies and Journalism

man with a knike nailed in his tongue "Oz polls show nothing can save this miserable govt. Election can not come soon enough.People decided and tuned out months ago." — Rupert Murdoch(@rupertmurdoch) May 19, 2013
'The nation is drowning in debt. The federal government has lost control of public finances. The NBN is a disaster. Business is struggling because union thugs are destroying productivity growth. We are being overwhelmed with illegal boat arrivals. Refugees are living on welfare and bleeding us dry.' (more…)

By Mr Denmore, ago
ABC

Of Human Bondage

An increasingly unhinged Australian mainstream media, with a few honourable exceptions, has been revving up the scary-o-meter in recent days about this country facing a future of debt, deficits and public penury for as far as the eye can see.  
“A decade of deficits spells a bleak future for Australians,” was the headline on the increasingly tabloid ABC television news, warning of a crisis bigger than the one where Bates went to jail in Downton Abbey.  I spluttered over my warmed up risotto (my lovely wife was out at the movies) and quickly checked my Bloomberg terminal.
(more…)

By Mr Denmore, ago
Craft Standards

Media Stockholm Syndrome

'Twenty Ways to Bulk Up Your Cash'. That was the breathless headline in The Australian Financial Review on September, 27, 2005 "It's shop till you drop for ordinary people with money to park," the article gushed. "And the range of investment options is so vast, it's very nearly an embarrassment of riches." (more…)

By Mr Denmore, ago
Craft Standards

Future Shockers

"Prediction is very difficult, particularly about the future." Journalists would do well to keep in mind that aphorism from influential Danish physicist Nils Bohr when quoting "experts" about the outlook for financial markets, the economy and politics. (more…)

By Mr Denmore, ago
ABC

Spinning Wheel

A health warning to mainstream media consumers: When a news story starts with the words "is expected to", activate the BS detector. When that story involves forecasts about economic statistics, shift detector to warp speed. (more…)

By Mr Denmore, ago
Craft Standards

A Day in the Life

I read the news today. Oh boy. Apparently, Australia is now a socialist dictatorship run by red rag shop stewards stealing the legitimate rewards of those with enterprise and throwing it away on the undeserving poor. "Once again, nothing in it for me," said  'Single Dad' in the comments section of a Sydney Morning Herald analysis from Adele Ferguson describing Wayne Swan's fifth budget as 'Class Warfare'. Over at 'The Heart of the Nation', meanwhile, the splash was 'Smash the Rich, Save the Base', with Swan and Gillard seen leading an angry mob against a hammer and sickle backdrop. (more…)

By Mr Denmore, ago
ABC

Going Analog

It is less than 20 years ago that the US financial news organisation I then worked for started asking journalists to put an email address at the bottom of every story. I remember snorting at the presumption that our readers were as nerdish as our tech-head editor in Washington. Move on two decades and we find journalists doing the bulk of their work over the internet - through research, finding contacts, sourcing background, remote editing and doing interviews. Technology has transformed the craft from one-to-many publishing to many-to-many. But for all the ease that digital newsgathering has provided, there is still something to be said for getting out from behind the screen and into the analog world. (more…)

By Mr Denmore, ago
Books

The Mega Perspective

Good journalists still exist. It's just that these days,with few exceptions, they tend to exist despite, rather than because of, the media organisations that employ them. One is Laura Tingle, who continues to write penetrating and original analysis of politics. Another is George Megalogenis, whose sober, measured style and grasp of historical detail make him one of the few remaining reliable chroniclers of Australian political economy (and one of the few reasons, if any, to read The Australian). (more…)

By Mr Denmore, ago