Stuck Inside of Mobile

Posted 5 CommentsPosted in Advertising, Business Models, Digital Media, Entrepreneurial Journalism, Media Business, Mobile, Staffing and Resources

The digital revolution will not be televised. And it’s not in the newspapers either. In fact, media companies don’t seem to get the revolution at all. A decade and half since newspapers started distractedly plastering their content all over the internet (mistaking the web as just another publishing platform), the media owners are getting whacked anew.

Talking Back

Posted 6 CommentsPosted in Blogging, Books, Experimental Formats, New Media, Public Interest, Social Media

In age in which we are flooded with largely depressing books on the death of traditional media and establishment journalism, it’s exciting to read the perspective of someone who has grown up in new media and who celebrates the rise of the audience. Tim Dunlop, a writer, academic and one of Australia’s pioneer political bloggers, has written a refreshing insiders’ account of the rise of the new media insurgency. […]

Estate of the Nation

Posted 11 CommentsPosted in Blogging, Books, New Media, News Corp, Newspapers, Opinion, Social Media

  If it hadn’t been Grog’s Gamut, it would have been someone else. The unmasking of the popular political blogger by The Australian newspaper in 2010 served in retrospect as the moment when blogging in Australia gained something of a critical mass. Until then, the nation’s mainstream media had treated blogs as background noise, at best, unrelated to the real business of journalism and political commentary. But when News […]

Burying the Lead

Posted 7 CommentsPosted in Business Models, Government Policy and Regulation, Media Business, New Media, Newspapers, Technology

Much of the discussion around the future of mainstream media journalism is about money. Who’s going to pay the journos’ salaries? What’s a viable business model? Will the revenue generated by the erection of paywalls be sufficient to make up for the loss of audiences? ABC Radio’s Saturday Extra took that angle recently, in an item entitled ‘Newspapers and the Media of the Future’. Norman Swan, standing in for […]

Why Journalists Fear Academics

Posted 58 CommentsPosted in Craft Standards, Ethical Standards, Government Policy and Regulation, News Corp, Newspapers, Opinion

What’s most likely to keep journalists awake at night? That they will be ‘scooped’? Please. In 2012 in the age of Twitter? Hardly. After all, they all copy and paste the same PR releases and transcripts. Nope, what really gnaws at journalists is the fear that they will be exposed as flakes, dilettantes, copycats and pretenders. In days gone by, this wasn’t a big risk. After all, academics for […]

The End of the Affairs?

Posted 10 CommentsPosted in Craft Standards, Digital Media, Public Broadcasting, Staffing and Resources

A truism about journalism is that it consists of applying six basic questions to issues of public interest: Who, What, Where, When, How and Why. In breaking news, journalists often will deal with the first four questions fairly readily. The last two are sometimes harder. Decades ago, public broadcasting sought to deal with this challenge by splitting the roles of journalists between the who, what, where and when people […]